Learning at School Conference

Milestone Requirement: Report on the impact of your cluster’s attendance at the 2010 Learning at School Conference and on how this has influenced your programme.

Learning@School10

Cluster attendees:

Lead School Principal Margaret Palmer (Waterlea School), Cluster Facilitators Jane Lomas (Waterlea School), Glenis Martin (HOT), Lead Teacher Waterlea School - Leigh Nicholson). [Also Pam Hook and Julie Mills (HOT)]

Impact of attendance:


Influence of attendance on Cluster Programme


Reflections



On Stuart Middleton's Keynote - School Looks Good But is it Engaging?

Stuart asked us to think in Curnow style about "Who reaches a future down?"

…… Who reaches

A future down for us from the high shelf

Of spiritual daring?

Allan Curnow in Landfall in Unknown Seas





I so thoroughly enjoyed listening to Stuart Middleton's keynote - he used statistics, analogy and humour to great effect. The experience led me to search for more of Stuart's educational thinking - even more delight.

Stuart's blog EDTalkNZ is now a catalyst for my educational and political thinking - it is well reasoned and provocative. Highly recommended to any educators who are looking for analysis over description in an edu_blog.

For example read the following blog extracts - better still follow the link to read the whole post:

On having the best education system in the world:

We have the best education system in the world for some students.

The recent figure of 30,000 daily truants added to the 20,000 who disengage from school prior to age 16 means that teachers can’t do their work with a large number who will never be touched by the curriculum - however good it is – or teachers – however superb they are.

What do we know about students that requires us to have sets of teachers that have different qualifications, different preparation, are represented by different professional bodies, paid on different pay scales and have no ongoing, meaningful and functional connection with each other? It is over to students and their families to manage this complexity. http://www.stuartmiddleton.co.nz/?p=251

On National Standards:

If Tolley has “failed” by winning only 73% community support for the Government’s National Standards policy then many of her cabinet colleagues must be wondering how they too can be such a flop.

The NZ Herald reported that 73% of parents supported the introduction of the National Standards while only 14% were not in favour. Pretty conclusive I would say. But the most interesting result of the survey was that when asked whether they understood how the new system worked, 62% reported that they did not while only 12% said that they did.

This supports the view proposed in last week’s EdTalkNZ’s column that the education profession had done less well at educating and persuading the community than has the government. The argument has been well and truly won by the view that it was time that the community was better informed as to the real progress of young students than the proposition that it was a methodologically and professionally fraught exercise.

Forget the intricate arguments. Forget the worries that league tables will emerge. Remember that the only league table parents are interested in is the one that pits their son or daughter against the pile of boys and girls they go to school with. Is my boy, is my girl doing OK? And how do you know? And are they about where they should be at their age? It isn’t rocket science according to parents even though teachers with some justification believe that it is a difficult and complex business.

Or put another way, parents don’t care a fig for our chatter. Simply, they want to know if Sione or Moeawa (or Emma and Zac) can read or write at a level that is appropriate to their age. It is time for the teaching profession to acknowledge their right to this and, as we say these days, move on! http://www.stuartmiddleton.co.nz/?p=236

On teaching kids to read and write:

There was a tendency for the school system to take up a call for increased resources as the default position whenever change is proposed. Give us the tools and we will do the job! But there are many jobs that schools simply can’t do – compensating for poor housing, coping with inadequate health provision, providing the support for children that family sustaining wages bring into homes and so on.

What then can we do? The great irony is that we can teach young ones to read and write and do their sums. There might be evidence that when we succeed in this, we do it as well as any system in the world. But…..

“Every day in New Zealand, 150,000 children are not being taught to read and write.”

The English-speaking education systems (i.e. Australia, Canada, United States, Great Britain and NZ) all face the same dilemma. The students we are good at teaching are becoming a smaller proportion of the school population while those we have, in all honesty, always struggled with are becoming much more prevalent. What we used to think of as minorities will become majorities – indeed they already have in many places. The issues that we face in New Zealand are the same issues faced throughout those English-speaking education systems. What we have got in our favour is the question of scale.

Coping with 150,000 (if that is the figure) failing students is a much easier call than say coping with the issues of Hispanics in the US system. If we knew who those 150,000 young ones are, then is it beyond our wit to do something about it? If schools and their teachers do know who they are (Remember Claim 1: “We are already doing this.”) and can assess just where each student has reached (Remember Claim 2: “We already have a good testing regime.”) then why is this issue seemingly but doggedly continuing to haunt us?

“Every day in New Zealand, 150,000 children are not being taught to read and write.”

I cannot bring myself to believe that we don’t know what to do. I can only assume that we have somewhere along the way lost a sense of the points to which we should take young people in their journey through school. What constitutes good preparation for starting school? What should be the point that signifies completion of basic / elementary / primary education? What is the role of secondary schools in preparing students for whatever is to foolw?

Perhaps our understanding of student progress has been too fixed on accurate assessment of only where a student is rather than on where they should be and how to get there. We have replaced the six standards of primary education and the much more sharply defined purpose of secondary schooling with chunks of goals and purposes which are so large it’s easy for individual students to struggle and even to disappear. We have to address the fact that “Every day in New Zealand, 150,000 children are not being taught to read and write.” http://www.stuartmiddleton.co.nz/?p=231

Who reaches a future down?

We do ... and we can thank Stuart for being so gentle in his reminder of our responsibilities.

Pam Hook 4 May 2010


On Alan November's Keynote -The Emerging Culture of Teaching and Learning

Alan November is recognised as a leader in education technology. His areas of expertise include information and communication technology, planning across the curriculum, staff development, long-range planning, building learning communities and leadership development.
By using technology everyone has access to thought leaders around the world. They can be brought to any place without the expense and time of actually travelling. So it was appropriate that Alan gave his keynote via Skype.
external image alan2-300x200.jpg
Alan discussed the key skills for today’s children and these form the structure of this talk:
  • Global collaboration
  • Deal with overwhelming amounts of information
  • To be self directed
The most important question he believes to be asked is who owns the learning? Alan believes in the philosophical onset that every student is a teacher and every teacher is a student.
He demonstrated how you can zoom in on one countries information by using the word “site:tr (the ‘tr’ stands for the country code of the perspective you would like to search for). This is a way to make sure you are gaining information from different points of view as straight google searches give you a very western perspective in the results.
He shared some interesting websites that can be used in the classroom - these include:
www.easywhois.com type in the domain name of a website and it tells you who owns the domain so you can evalutate the information
www.archive.org – this site has the way back machine. Use the search bar to type in your website and it will give you the history of the website from the time it was launched. You can view the different versions of the site and how it has changed over time.
www.stormfront.com
He believes that children should know these tools to help recognise what is truth in what they gathering. when researching the net

Alan shared the following to demonstrate students taking on teaching roles, and demonstrating deep learning:
http://mathtrain.tv - Students design tutorials to help other children learn.
http://www.studentnewsaction.net
http://isenet.ning.com – independent school teachers
http://www.wolframalpha.com/ - Wolfram alpha – investigate this for your math classes
His message was clear and that was that given that there are incredible tools on the web, students opportunity to learn through ICT is in their own hands. Overall this was a very informative and enjoyable keynote.

Glenis Martin 5 May 2010




Learning@School11

Cluster attendees:

Pam Hook, Julie Mills, Margaret Palmer (Principal Waterlea School - Lead School), Helen Smith (Waterlea), Rehana Karim (Al-Madinah), Qamar Sultana (Al-Madinah)

Impact of attendance:


Influence of attendance on Cluster Programme


Reflections


Reports


Pam Hook

BTG conference attendees made the most of the many opportunities to work with and listen to NZ teachers using SOLO Taxonomy and e-learning at Learning at School. A shared pedagogical context context meant new connections were made and new friendships established. Cluster principals will be inviting some of the presenters to join a BTG Lead Teacher and or Principal Day to share their presentations with cluster teachers who were unable to attend.

Workshops featuring SOLO Taxonomy and e-learning outcomes included:

Spotlight Medley

Assessment for learning
Presenters:
We are used to the kind of "assessment for learning" used in a consumer culture where students are both consumer and commodity, and schools are charged with setting targets and meeting standards, to make the product of "providing school's visible. It is worth considering the kind of "assessment for learning" that is appropriate for a digital culture where students are "consumers" "commodities" and "producers" of learning. To ask, what kind of "assessment for learning" is appropriate in the age of Google and Wikipedia? Facebook and You Tube? Smart phones and text messaging? Twitter and blogging? (after Manovich on Soft Cinema).

Breakout 1 - Wed 23rd 11.15am

Learning to Learn - at Star of the Sea
Presenters: Peta Lindstrom, Detta Fairweather / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Our school was part of the Ministry ICT contract 2007-2009 and in our final year we focussed on effective pedagogy that supported and strengthened our students' thinking and learning. With support from the "Hooked on Thinking" facilitators, Julie Mills and Pam Hook, we have implemented SOLO taxonomy "Learning to Learn" school wide. Our presentation will cover "getting to grips" with a concept learning programme that uses SOLO taxonomy to help students develop higher order levels of thinking, knowledge and understanding. This leads to students knowing what they are doing in their learning, how well they are doing it and how they can improve. The presentation will cover aspects of: Introduction of SOLO taxonomy The use of maps, rubrics and statements within the classroom programme Implications for our school curriculum design and implementation Successes and pitfalls of implementing SOLO school-wide Our own learning Where we are at and our next steps



The Big Event
Presenters: Julie Mills, Pam Hook / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
The latest New Zealand Transport Agency educational resource which covers all learning areas and is designed using SOLO Taxonomy against all elements of the New Zealand curriculum. The Big Event workshop is suitable for Yr1-Yr8 teachers and is written within a local and authentic context for when any Big Event is being hosted in New Zealand. The unit has been constructed so that any event could be inserted into the framework. It also has ICTs constructively aligned against learning experiences so that all integration of technology is purposeful. Each participant will receive a printed copy of this curriculum. A timeless resource of teaching and learning.
Breakout 4 - Thur 24th 2.00pm

Planning and implementing a concept-based curriculum (and see SOLO in action!)
Presenters: Bridget Casse, Rowena Pearson / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Halsey Drive School staff have developed a visionary, concept-based curriculum, at the heart of which lies SOLO taxonomy. Our school-wide language of learning is instrumental to the implementation of our curriculum. Our staff use a range of highly effective thinking tools to cater for differentiated learning across all levels. We have been actively monitoring shifts in teacher pedagogy and student learning outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of our practice and to inform our future focus. We will share our journey to date, from inception, to implementation and evaluation, while offering some practical advice and strategies along the way.

Breakout 6 - Frid 25th 10.45am

HOT 2 B SOLO
Presenters: Lisa Reweti, Willow Wilkie / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Our presentation is assessment based and consist of five stages; the NZ curriculum, national standards, progressions, formats, and SOLO rubrics. Using these stages we will showcase how easy it can be to construct a SOLO rubric based on a New Zealand curriculum learning area, an achievement objective and correlating standard and progression and format that reflects the chosen curriculum area. The pre-constructed SOLO rubric will be relevant to the learning area and the students thinking, it is designed as a self and peer assessment tool, but the overall judgement remains with the teacher.




Implementing New Zealand Curriculum / Te Marautanga o Aotearoa
Presenters: Fintan Kelly, Paula Dron / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
This workshop will share a framework for mapping a school wide concept curriculum that both integrates and aligns concepts, the achievement objectives, key competencies and values in the New Zealand Curriculum. This approach uses the HOT Differentiated Curriculum model and SOLO taxonomy to develop three essential questions differentiated for each concept. Appropriate achievement objectives are unpacked using SOLO learning verbs to create learning intentions and plan learning experiences for differentiated outcomes. The planning that supports the curriculum mapping uses SOLO Taxonomy coded HOT Maps and self assessment rubrics to develop a common language for learning. Workshop examples and activities will share the Waikowhai Primary School Curriculum Map for 2010 and 2011, related teacher planning and student learning outcomes.

Breakout 6a

Introducing SOLO using Feet First
Presenters: Liz Williams, Jayne Barraclough / Session Type: Taster Session (40 min)
Need an easy no stress way of introducing SOLO Taxonomy into your class or school? In this session we will introduce you to the NZTA free resources "Walk and be Safe" and "The Big event". Both these resources have been created using SOLO and link to all the curriculum and have easy to follow ICT links. "The Big event, designed specifically for the 2011 Rugby World Cup and perfect for Inquiry in 2011. We have been using these resources at Hawera Primary in 2010 and are keen to share our journey with the resource, SOLO and ICT so far.


Writing for Success – Using ICT to motivate and Improve Student Writing
Presenters: Val McHale/ Katie Peden/Jessie Williams Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Enhancing literacy outcomes using technology and SOLO Taxonomy to engage and motivate student writers




Margaret Palmer

Teaching as Inquiry – Action Research (2 workshops).
Links were made to NZC’s focus on teaching as inquiry. Schools enjoyed success when:
  1. Current theory supported teachers in the form of professional readings e.g. NZCER Carol Cardno Action Research: a developmental approach and hiring external expertise.
  2. The whole school was involved (including teacher aides and principal etc. all set goals) – an “all in” philosophy.
  3. The focus was on learning
  4. Teachers used evidence / data to see the need for change and revisited the evidence to see what their next steps would be.
  5. Reflection time:
    1. For teachers was built into the programme and this was then transferred into classrooms.
    2. Through teacher reflection teacher confidence grew
    3. Questions asked were of teachers and their classes (a way forward was co-constructed with the students):
i. What do we know?
ii. What do we want to find out?
iii. Why?
  1. When the cluster got together the teachers were the presenters – they were seen to be the best sales people.
  2. When setting personal goals SMART goals were increased to be SMARTER goals
    1. Specific
    2. Measurable
    3. Achievable
    4. Realistic
    5. Time bond
    6. Extending
    7. Rewarding
  3. Professional Learning Communities were set up ( triads operated where one reported, one questioned and the third recorded)
  4. Teacher’s goals were connected to the schools goals. These were linked to appraisal.
  5. Appraisal expectations:
    1. Portfolios
    2. Teachers sharing their work
    3. Teachers demonstrating what they have learned
    4. One school found that the use of critical friends did not work but when teachers were appraised by their team leaders improvements were significant
  6. Observing other teachers, release and time were factored in
  7. Questioning became important
    1. “so what?”
    2. “now what?”
  8. Staff meeting were used for PD and celebrations only with no admin
  9. Acting on student voice - children were asked how successful their teachers were being as they worked towards their goals.

Difficult Conversations – Can you see what I can see? – Joan Dalton
http://www.leadingadultlearners.com/
http://www.plotpd.com.au/home.htm
We all have our own mental models that we use as filters.
The language we use creates our realty
Tips for having conversations included:
1. Have the conversations
2. Never say “Ï” statements e.g. “I hear you saying” instead say “you are saying”
3. Stay low on the ladder of inference – at the evidence level
4. Listen; paraphrase; inquire (paraphrasing is the bridge between listening and inquiring
Scott McLeod
The most significant message for me was that children come to school as unique beings and school is like a filter where what we end up with is complaint children.
Big shifts:
Sustaining innovation – they are improvements e.g. mobile phone
Disrupting innovations - they replace – e.g. cell phones
Some work is location dependant and other work is location independent
The web has destroyed geography
We need skilled and creative workers.
1890 pedagogical paradigm is the same as that of 2011.
Teacher centric technologies / student centric technologies
How much time do out children spend in higher order thinking activities
Team Building:
Team members need:
· To trust one another
· They do not fear conflict
· They are committed
· They step up and are accountable
· They pay attention to results
When teachers are stressed they are in no state to receive challenges
Keep blame out of team building – consider things that go wrong as a challenge then list all the things affecting the situation and deal with them from the list
The connection between supporting and challenging people is where relationships are built.

Moodle:
Huge possibilities but this session was secondary based.
http://quizlet.com/ Quizlet useful site as it creates quizzes in 4 styles

Qamar Sultana

Useful Educational Websites
www.starfall.com
www.literacycenter.net
http://www.topmarks.co.uk
http://www.rayslearning.com/lettersa.htm
http://www.ictgames.com/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/wordsandpictures/phonics/sandcastle/flash/game.shtml
http://softwareforlearning.tki.org.nz/
http://tutpup.com/
http://tarheelreader.org/
www.starfall.com
http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/games-tools/comic-creator-a-30237.html
http://www.naturalreaders.com
http://dspeech.en.softonic.com/
http://www.childrensbooksforever.com/index.html
http://www.childrenslibrary.org/
http://www.storybee.org/index.html
http://www.ictgames.com/resources.html
Telling Time
http://www.mrmyers.org/Math_Mania/Math_Games/Jude_e-Clock/clock.htm
http://www.kidsolr.com/earlychildhood/page4.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/dynamo/den/clock/index.htm
http://www.time-for-time.com/interactive.htm
Place Value http://www.homeschoolmath.net/online/place_value.php
http://education.jlab.org/placevalue/index.html another game
http://www.gamequarium.com/placevalue.html more games
Fractions
National Library of Virtual Manipulatives
http://nlvm.usu.edu/en/nav/index.html
Visual fractions
http://www.visualfractions.com/
Mr. Glosser's Math goodies
http://www.mathgoodies.com/lessons/
Topmarks
http://www.topmarks.co.uk/EducationalGames.aspx?cat=1
Maths games for 3 – 14 years
Good categories and lots of options
http://www.coolmath-games.com
The Virtual Labs http://science.uniserve.edu.au/school/resource/virtsci.html#VL
Large number of virtual science resources
Why files
http://whyfiles.org/category/interactives/
http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/gamesactivities.html
LEARNZ
http://www.learnz.org.nz/index.php
NZ field Trips
Tux Paint
http://www.tuxpaint.org/
Drawing for Children
http://www.cs.uu.nl/people/markov/kids/index.html
Draw.to
http://draw.to/new
Drawing program
Share online
Timtim
http://www.timtim.com/coloring/drawing/
Drawing and colouring program
Online
http://www.voki.com/
http://eng.kiamau.tki.org.nz/
http://www.ruben.govt.nz/page/ruben_10.php (scroll down!)
http://www.roadsafetyni.gov.uk/index/education/kidzone/kidzone-games.htm


Learning@School12

http://core-ed.org/learningatschool/

Cluster attendees:

Waterlea Primary Staff: Principal Margaret Palmer and all staff - insert names here
Jean Batten Staff: Nadine Crocker, insert names here
Al-Madinah Staff: Amjad Ali, Qamar Sultana, insert names here
Royal Oak Intermediate Staff: None attending

Reflections

Hon. Hekia Parata MP - Opening at Learning at School 2012



Celebrity Photos

Lats12 Hekia Parata and Nadine


Jean Batten Reflections

Nadine's
Lats12 Slideshows











Spotlight Medley
ROAD TRIP SOUTH FOR WATERLEA STAFF
As the sun beamed down in the Jan holidays, car loads of Waterlea teachers were trapped in non air conditioned cars as they made the trek to the learning at schools conference!
Our excited voices could be heard discussing the various breakouts we had chosen...
From Frank Green talking about communities within a school to Kevin Honeycutt making ict links as he captivated the audience with his life story...many highlights (apart from the top nosh) could be taken from this two day conference from all.
Assessment for learning
Presenters:
Here are just some of the comments from Waterlea teachers...
  • great variety of workshops available
  • inspiring
  • great to be exposed to new ideas
  • Mike Scaddan breakouts were fantastic
  • The music and picture show before the key notes - great.
  • spending time with colleagues out of school
  • mixing with new colleagues
  • reflective
  • most key speakers vibrant and enthusiastic
  • Kevin Honeycutt was brilliant
  • New websites to use in the classroom
  • Lots of fun giveaway
We are used to the kind of "assessment for learning" used in a consumer culture where students are both consumer and commodity, and schools are charged with setting targets and meeting standards, to make the product of "providing school's visible. It is worth considering the kind of "assessment for learning" that is appropriate for a digital culture where students are "consumers" "commodities" and "producers" of learning. To ask, what kind of "assessment for learning" is appropriate in the age of Google and Wikipedia? Facebook and You Tube? Smart phones and text messaging? Twitter and blogging? (after Manovich on Soft Cinema).
Breakout 1 - Wed 23rd 11.15am
Learning to Learn - at Star of the Sea
Presenters: Peta Lindstrom, Detta Fairweather / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Our school was part of the Ministry ICT contract 2007-2009 and in our final year we focussed on effective pedagogy that supported and strengthened our students' thinking and learning. With support from the "Hooked on Thinking" facilitators, Julie Mills and Pam Hook, we have implemented SOLO taxonomy "Learning to Learn" school wide. Our presentation will cover "getting to grips" with a concept learning programme that uses SOLO taxonomy to help students develop higher order levels of thinking, knowledge and understanding. This leads to students knowing what they are doing in their learning, how well they are doing it and how they can improve. The presentation will cover aspects of: Introduction of SOLO taxonomy The use of maps, rubrics and statements within the classroom programme Implications for our school curriculum design and implementation Successes and pitfalls of implementing SOLO school-wide Our own learning Where we are at and our next steps
The Big Event
Presenters: Julie Mills, Pam Hook / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
The latest New Zealand Transport Agency educational resource which covers all learning areas and is designed using SOLO Taxonomy against all elements of the New Zealand curriculum. The Big Event workshop is suitable for Yr1-Yr8 teachers and is written within a local and authentic context for when any Big Event is being hosted in New Zealand. The unit has been constructed so that any event could be inserted into the framework. It also has ICTs constructively aligned against learning experiences so that all integration of technology is purposeful. Each participant will receive a printed copy of this curriculum. A timeless resource of teaching and learning.
Breakout 4 - Thur 24th 2.00pm
Planning and implementing a concept-based curriculum (and see SOLO in action!)
Presenters: Bridget Casse, Rowena Pearson / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Halsey Drive School staff have developed a visionary, concept-based curriculum, at the heart of which lies SOLO taxonomy. Our school-wide language of learning is instrumental to the implementation of our curriculum. Our staff use a range of highly effective thinking tools to cater for differentiated learning across all levels. We have been actively monitoring shifts in teacher pedagogy and student learning outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of our practice and to inform our future focus. We will share our journey to date, from inception, to implementation and evaluation, while offering some practical advice and strategies along the way.
Breakout 6 - Frid 25th 10.45am
HOT 2 B SOLO
Presenters: Lisa Reweti, Willow Wilkie / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Our presentation is assessment based and consist of five stages; the NZ curriculum, national standards, progressions, formats, and SOLO rubrics. Using these stages we will showcase how easy it can be to construct a SOLO rubric based on a New Zealand curriculum learning area, an achievement objective and correlating standard and progression and format that reflects the chosen curriculum area. The pre-constructed SOLO rubric will be relevant to the learning area and the students thinking, it is designed as a self and peer assessment tool, but the overall judgement remains with the teacher.
Implementing New Zealand Curriculum / Te Marautanga o Aotearoa
Presenters: Fintan Kelly, Paula Dron / Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
This workshop will share a framework for mapping a school wide concept curriculum that both integrates and aligns concepts, the achievement objectives, key competencies and values in the New Zealand Curriculum. This approach uses the HOT Differentiated Curriculum model and SOLO taxonomy to develop three essential questions differentiated for each concept. Appropriate achievement objectives are unpacked using SOLO learning verbs to create learning intentions and plan learning experiences for differentiated outcomes. The planning that supports the curriculum mapping uses SOLO Taxonomy coded HOT Maps and self assessment rubrics to develop a common language for learning. Workshop examples and activities will share the Waikowhai Primary School Curriculum Map for 2010 and 2011, related teacher planning and student learning outcomes.
Breakout 6a
Introducing SOLO using Feet First
Presenters: Liz Williams, Jayne Barraclough / Session Type: Taster Session (40 min)
Need an easy no stress way of introducing SOLO Taxonomy into your class or school? In this session we will introduce you to the NZTA free resources "Walk and be Safe" and "The Big event". Both these resources have been created using SOLO and link to all the curriculum and have easy to follow ICT links. "The Big event, designed specifically for the 2011 Rugby World Cup and perfect for Inquiry in 2011. We have been using these resources at Hawera Primary in 2010 and are keen to share our journey with the resource, SOLO and ICT so far.
Writing for Success – Using ICT to motivate and Improve Student Writing
Presenters: Val McHale/ Katie Peden/Jessie Williams Session Type: Presentation (Interactive 90 min)
Enhancing literacy outcomes using technology and SOLO Taxonomy to engage and motivate student writers